LFI Header Image

Counselling & Therapy

Focusing was originally discovered by listening closely to what successful therapy clients were doing during their sessions.

Clients who got the change they wanted from therapy were paying attention to their bodily experience in a careful way. These clients paid attention to how their bodies responded to what was being said, by them and by their therapist. These bodily responses guided the client in their explorations. This meant that they could actually feel themselves changing, step by step.

The philosopher who originally described Focusing, Eugene Gendlin, found he could teach this kind of bodily attention and that most people could quite easily re-learn how to be guided naturally by their own experience.

Since it was first described in the 1950s, Focusing has been the subject of academic and clinical research and has been incorporated into numerous counselling, psychotherapy and psychology trainings.The approach sits well with existential therapy, where the therapist engages in open dialogue rather than imposing ‘expert’ opinion. It is still unusual to find a Certified Focusing-oriented Therapist.

The London Focusing Institute is a member of The International Association of Focusing-oriented Therapists (IAFOTs) and offers training for registered therapists and counsellors who would like to achieve Focusing Institute certification. Focusing training is also available for trainee counsellors and psychotherapists currently enrolled in a training course. Institutions are welcome to request ad hoc Focusing input into their advanced training curriculum.

Professionals who are interested in incorporating Focusing into how they already practice are encouraged to contact us for information on workshops specifically designed for experienced counsellors, coaches, supervisors, and mental health professionals.